(01/12/2015)

Government policies should offer more support to enterprises to license and transfer technology in order to increase their competitiveness, according to a report entitled "Firm-Level Competitiveness and Technology in Viet Nam", issued yesterday by the Royal Embassy of Denmark.

 

Government policies should offer more support to enterprises to license and transfer technology in order to increase their competitiveness, according to a report entitled "Firm-Level Competitiveness and Technology in Viet Nam", issued yesterday by the Royal Embassy of Denmark.

There was a lot of room for improvement and support schemes needed to be made more transparent and easier for enterprises to apply, said Professor John Rand from the University of Copenhagen, one of the report researchers.

A large gap remained between policy and practice and the proportion of firms integrating new technology continued to be small, the report said.

Only a very small number of firms have invested in technology adaptation and research and development, despite such Government policies as the National Focal Technical-Economic Programmes and the National Technology Renewal Foundation, as well as indirect support through the tax regime, the report noted.

Findings from the National Science and Technology Survey of over 7,000 enterprises conducted in 2011 showed that 84 per cent had no technology adaptation or R&D programmes, with the number engaging in R&D and technology adaptation at only 8 per cent and 5 per cent, respectively.

Of those firms, over 75 per cent used their own financial resources and were forced to adapt technology rather than purchase it due to cost limitations, the report said.

Exports were a driving influence for technology spillovers because exporting exposed Vietnamese enterprises to new processes and equipment. Longer contract relationships also helped establish higher levels of trust and increased the chance of transfers occurring. Yet, while the report revealed that about 1,300 of the 7,000 surveyed enterprises were exporters, only 1 per cent had contracts with suppliers or customers for 36 months or more.

Enabling firms to move into new overseas markets should remain a priority for policymakers, said the report, pointing to evidence from other countries that one of the benefits of foreign investment were technology spillovers.

 

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